Kopmann A., Chilingaryan S., Vogelgesang M., Dritschler T., Shkarin A., Shkarin R., Dos Santos Rolo T., Farago T., Van De Kamp T., Balzer M., Caselle M., Weber M., Baumbach T.

in 2016 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference and Room-Temperature Semiconductor Detector Workshop, NSS/MIC/RTSD 2016, 2017-January (2017), 8069895. DOI:10.1109/NSSMIC.2016.8069895


© 2016 IEEE. New imaging stations aim for high spatial and temporal resolution and are characterized by ever increasing sampling rates and demanding data processing workflows. Key to successful imaging experiments is to open up high-performance computing resources. This includes carefully selected components for computing hardware and development of advanced imaging algorithms optimized for efficient use of parallel processor architectures. We present the novel UFO computing platform for online data processing for imaging experiments and image-based feedback. The platform handles the full data life cycle from the X-ray detector to long-term data archives. Core components of this system are an FPGA platform for ultra-fast data acquisition, the GPU-based UFO image processing framework, and the fast control system “Concert”. Reconstruction algorithms implemented in the UFO framework are optimized for the latest GPU architectures and provide a reconstruction throughput in the GB/s-range. The control system “Concert” integrates high-speed computing nodes and fast beamline devices and thus enables image-based control loops and advanced workflow automation for efficient beam time usage. Low latencies are ensured by direct communication between FPGA and GPUs using AMDs DirectGMA technology. Time resolved tomography is supported by cutting edge regularization methods for high quality reconstructions with a reduced number of projections. The new infrastructure at ANKA has dramatically accelerated tomography from hours to second and resulted in new application fields, like high-throughput tomography, pump-probe radiography and stroboscopic tomography. Ultra-fast X-ray cine-tomography for the first time allows one to observe internal dynamics of moving millimeter-sized objects in real-time.

Comments are closed.