Kehrer B., Brosi M., Steinmann J.L., Blomley E., Brundermann E., Caselle M., Funkner S., Hiller N., Nasse M.J., Niehues G., Rota L., Schedler M., Schonfeldt P., Schuh M., Schutze P., Weber M., Muller A.-S.

in Physical Review Accelerators and Beams, 21 (2018), 102803. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevAccelBeams.21.102803

Abstract

© 2018 authors. Published by the American Physical Society. To understand and control dynamics in the longitudinal phase space, time-resolved measurements of different bunch parameters are required. For a reconstruction of this phase space, the detector systems have to be synchronized. This reconstruction can be used for example for studies of the microbunching instability which occurs if the interaction of the bunch with its own radiation leads to the formation of substructures on the longitudinal bunch profile. These substructures can grow rapidly – leading to a sawtooth-like behavior of the bunch. At KARA, we use a fast-gated intensified camera for energy spread studies, Schottky diodes for coherent synchrotron radiation studies as well as electro-optical spectral decoding for longitudinal bunch profile measurements. For a synchronization, a synchronization scheme is used which compensates for hardware delays. In this paper, the different experimental setups and their synchronization are discussed and first results of synchronous measurements presented.

Evangelista Y. et al.

in Journal of Instrumentation, 13 (2018), P09011. DOI:10.1088/1748-0221/13/09/P09011

Abstract

© 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab. Multi-pixel fast silicon detectors represent the enabling technology for the next generation of space-borne experiments devoted to high-resolution spectral-timing studies of low-flux compact cosmic sources. Several imaging detectors based on frame-integration have been developed as focal plane devices for X-ray space-borne missions but, when coupled to large-area concentrator X-ray optics, these detectors are affected by strong pile-up and dead-time effects, thus limiting the time and energy resolution as well as the overall system sensitivity. The current technological gap in the capability to realize pixelated silicon detectors for soft X-rays with fast, photon-by-photon response and nearly Fano-limited energy resolution therefore translates into the unavailability of sparse read-out sensors suitable for high throughput X-ray astronomy applications. In the framework of the ReDSoX Italian collaboration, we developed a new, sparse read-out, pixelated silicon drift detector which operates in the energy range 0.5-15 keV with nearly Fano-limited energy resolution (≤150 eV FWHM @ 6 keV) at room temperature or with moderate cooling (∼0°C to +20°C). In this paper, we present the design and the laboratory characterization of the first 16-pixel (4 × 4) drift detector prototype (PixDD), read-out by individual ultra low-noise charge sensitive preamplifiers (SIRIO) and we discuss the future PixDD prototype developments.

Blank T., Pfistner P., Leyrer B., Caselle M., Simons C., Schmidt C.J., Weber M.

in 2018 International Conference on Electronics Packaging and iMAPS All Asia Conference, ICEP-IAAC 2018 (2018) 288-292. DOI:10.23919/ICEP.2018.8374306

Abstract

© 2018 Japan Institute of Electronics Packaging. The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment (CBM) investigates highly compressed nuclear matter, utilizing a Silicon Tracking System comprising 896 silicon sensors modules packed in eight layers with an overall area of four sqm. Each module consists of one sensor, 16 Read-Out Chips and 16 double-layer micro flex-cables, which are connected to the top and bottom side of the sensor. The cables are up to 50 cm long. They carry 128 signal traces on two layers at a pitch of 100 μm and a line-width of 25 μm. The layers are separated by a meshed core to reduce the cable capacity to 0.44 pF/cm. The cables are bonded onto one sensor by a pick and place flip-chip machine. The interconnection is realized by gold stud-bumps on the silicon and SAC solder bumps on the cable. The status of the sensor module and cable production process are presented.

Asadchikov V., Buzmakov A., Chukhovskii F., Dyachkova I., Zolotov D., Danilewsky A., Baumbach T., Bode S., Haaga S., Hanschke D., Kabukcuoglu M., Balzer M., Caselle M., Suvorov E.

in Journal of Applied Crystallography (2018). DOI:10.1107/S160057671801419X

Abstract

© International Union of Crystallography, 2018 This article describes complete characterization of the polygonal dislocation half-loops (PDHLs) introduced by scratching and subsequent bending of an Si(111) crystal. The study is based on the X-ray topo-tomography technique using both a conventional laboratory setup and the high-resolution X-ray image-detecting systems at the synchrotron facilities at KIT (Germany) and ESRF (France). Numerical analysis of PDHL images is performed using the Takagi–Taupin equations and the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) tomographic algorithm.

Rota L., Caselle M., Brundermann E., Funkner S., Gerth C., Kehrer B., Mielczarek A., Makowski D., Mozzanica A., Muller A.-S., Nasse M.J., Niehues G., Patil M., Schmitt B., Schonfeldt P., Steffen B., Weber M.

in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment (2018). DOI:10.1016/j.nima.2018.10.093

Abstract

© 2018 Synchrotrons and modern FEL light sources operate with bunch repetition rates in the MHz range. The profile of the electron beam inside the accelerator can be characterized with indirect experimental techniques where linear array detectors are employed to measure the emitted synchrotron radiation or the spectrum of a near-IR laser. To improve the performance of modern beam diagnostics we have developed KALYPSO, a detector system operating with a continuous frame rate of up to 2.7 MHz. To facilitate the integration in different experiments, a modular architecture has been adopted. Different semiconductor micro-strip sensors can be connected to front-end ASICs to optimize the quantum efficiency at different photon energies, ranging from visible light up to near-IR. The front-end electronics are integrated within an heterogeneous DAQ consisting of FPGAs and GPUs, which allows scientists to implement real-time data processing algorithms. The current version of the detector is in operation at the KARA synchrotron light source and at the European XFEL. In this contribution we present the detector architecture, the performance results and the on-going technical developments.

Aggleton R. et al.

in Journal of Instrumentation, 12 (2017), P12019. DOI:10.1088/1748-0221/12/12/P12019

Abstract

© 2017 CERN. A new tracking detector is under development for use by the CMS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). A crucial requirement of this upgrade is to provide the ability to reconstruct all charged particle tracks with transverse momentum above 2-3 GeV within 4 μs so they can be used in the Level-1 trigger decision. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are reconstructed using a projective binning algorithm based on the Hough Transform, followed by a combinatorial Kalman Filter. A hardware demonstrator using MP7 processing boards has been assembled to prove the entire system functionality, from the output of the tracker readout boards to the reconstruction of tracks with fitted helix parameters. It successfully operates on one eighth of the tracker solid angle acceptance at a time, processing events taken at 40 MHz, each with up to an average of 200 superimposed proton-proton interactions, whilst satisfying the latency requirement. The demonstrated track-reconstruction system, the chosen architecture, the achievements to date and future options for such a system will be discussed.

Kopmann A., Chilingaryan S., Vogelgesang M., Dritschler T., Shkarin A., Shkarin R., Dos Santos Rolo T., Farago T., Van De Kamp T., Balzer M., Caselle M., Weber M., Baumbach T.

in 2016 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference and Room-Temperature Semiconductor Detector Workshop, NSS/MIC/RTSD 2016, 2017-January (2017), 8069895. DOI:10.1109/NSSMIC.2016.8069895

Abstract

© 2016 IEEE. New imaging stations aim for high spatial and temporal resolution and are characterized by ever increasing sampling rates and demanding data processing workflows. Key to successful imaging experiments is to open up high-performance computing resources. This includes carefully selected components for computing hardware and development of advanced imaging algorithms optimized for efficient use of parallel processor architectures. We present the novel UFO computing platform for online data processing for imaging experiments and image-based feedback. The platform handles the full data life cycle from the X-ray detector to long-term data archives. Core components of this system are an FPGA platform for ultra-fast data acquisition, the GPU-based UFO image processing framework, and the fast control system “Concert”. Reconstruction algorithms implemented in the UFO framework are optimized for the latest GPU architectures and provide a reconstruction throughput in the GB/s-range. The control system “Concert” integrates high-speed computing nodes and fast beamline devices and thus enables image-based control loops and advanced workflow automation for efficient beam time usage. Low latencies are ensured by direct communication between FPGA and GPUs using AMDs DirectGMA technology. Time resolved tomography is supported by cutting edge regularization methods for high quality reconstructions with a reduced number of projections. The new infrastructure at ANKA has dramatically accelerated tomography from hours to second and resulted in new application fields, like high-throughput tomography, pump-probe radiography and stroboscopic tomography. Ultra-fast X-ray cine-tomography for the first time allows one to observe internal dynamics of moving millimeter-sized objects in real-time.

Aggleton R. et al.

in 2017 27th International Conference on Field Programmable Logic and Applications, FPL 2017 (2017), 8056825. DOI:10.23919/FPL.2017.8056825

Abstract

© 2017 Ghent University. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is scheduled for a major upgrade in the next decade in order to meet the demands of the new High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. Amongst others, a new tracking system is under development including an outer tracker capable of rejecting low transverse momentum particles by looking at the coincidences of hits (stubs) in two closely spaced sensor layers in the same tracker module. Accepted stubs are transmitted off-detector for further processing at 40 MHz. In order to maintain under the increased luminosity the Level-1 trigger rate at 750 kHz, tracker data need to be included in the decision making process. For this purpose, a system architecture has to be developed that will be able to identify particles with transverse momentum above 3 GeV/c by building tracks out of stubs, while achieving an overall processing latency of maximum 4us. Targeting these requirements the current paper presents an FPGA-based track finding architecture that identifies track candidates in real-time and bases its functionality on a fully time-multiplexed approach. As a proof of concept, a hardware system has been assembled targeting the MP7 MicroTCA processing card that features a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA, demonstrating a realistic slice of the track finder. The paper discusses the algorithms’ implementation and the efficient utilisation of the available FPGA resources, it outlines the system architecture, and presents some of the hardware demonstrator results.

Adam W. et al.

in Journal of Instrumentation, 12 (2017), P06018. DOI:10.1088/1748-0221/12/06/P06018

Abstract

© 2017 CERN for the benefit of the CMS collaboration.The upgrade of the LHC to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to increase the LHC design luminosity by an order of magnitude. This will require silicon tracking detectors with a significantly higher radiation hardness. The CMS Tracker Collaboration has conducted an irradiation and measurement campaign to identify suitable silicon sensor materials and strip designs for the future outer tracker at the CMS experiment. Based on these results, the collaboration has chosen to use n-in-p type silicon sensors and focus further investigations on the optimization of that sensor type. This paper describes the main measurement results and conclusions that motivated this decision.

Gentsos C., Fedi G., Magazzu G., Magalotti D., Modak A., Storchi L., Palla F., Bilei G.M., Biesuz N., Chowdhury S.R., Crescioli F., Checcucci B., Tcherniakhovski D., Galbit G.C., Baulieu G., Balzer M.N., Sander O., Viret S., Servoli L., Nikolaidis S.

in 2017 6th International Conference on Modern Circuits and Systems Technologies, MOCAST 2017 (2017), 7937676. DOI:10.1109/MOCAST.2017.7937676

Abstract

© 2017 IEEE. The increase of the luminosity in the High Luminosity upgrade of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will require the use of Tracker information in the evaluation of the Level-1 trigger in order to keep the trigger rate acceptable (i.e.: <1MHz). In order to extract the track information within the latency constraints (<5μs), a custom real-time system is necessary. We developed a prototype of the main building block of this system, the Pattern Recognition Mezzanine (PRM) that combines custom Associative Memory ASICs with modern FPGA devices. The architecture, functionality and test results of the PRM are described in the present work.