Lautner S., Lenz C., Hammel J., Moosmann J., Kuhn M., Caselle M., Vogelgesang M., Kopmann A., Beckmann F.

in Proceedings of SPIE – The International Society for Optical Engineering, 10391 (2017), 1039118. DOI:10.1117/12.2287221

Abstract

© 2017 SPIE. Water transport from roots to shoots is a vital necessity in trees in order to sustain their photosynthetic activity and, hence, their physiological activity. The vascular tissue in charge is the woody body of root, stem and branches. In gymnosperm trees, like spruce trees (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), vascular tissue consists of tracheids: elongated, protoplast- free cells with a rigid cell wall that allow for axial water transport via their lumina. In order to analyze the over-all water transport capacity within one growth ring, time-consuming light microscopy analysis of the woody sample still is the conventional approach for calculating tracheid lumen area. In our investigations at the Imaging Beamline (IBL) operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG) at PETRA III storage ring of the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg, we applied SRμCT on small wood samples of spruce trees in order to visualize and analyze size and formation of xylem elements and their respective lumina. The selected high-resolution phase-contrast technique makes full use of the novel 20 MPixel CMOS area detector developed within the cooperation of HZG and the Karlsruhe data by light microscopy analysis and, hence, prove, that μCT is a most appropriate method to gain valid information on xylem cell structure and tree water transport capacity.

Jerome N.T., Chilingaryan S., Shkarin A., Kopmann A., Zapf M., Lizin A., Bergmann T.

in VISIGRAPP 2017 – Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications, 3 (2017) 152-163.

Abstract

Copyright © 2017 by SCITEPRESS – Science and Technology Publications, Lda. All rights reserved.With data sets growing beyond terabytes or even petabytes in scientific experiments, there is a trend of keeping data at storage facilities and providing remote cloud-based services for analysis. However, accessing these data sets remotely is cumbersome due to additional network latency and incomplete metadata description. To ease data browsing on remote data archives, our WAVE framework applies an intelligent cache management to provide scientists with a visual feedback on the large data set interactively. In this paper, we present methods to reduce the data set size while preserving visual quality. Our framework supports volume rendering and surface rendering for data inspection and analysis. Furthermore, we enable a zoom-on-demand approach, where a selected volumetric region is reloaded with higher details. Finally, we evaluated the WAVE framework using a data set from the entomology science research.

Bergmann T., Balzer M., Hopp T., Van De Kamp T., Kopmann A., Jerome N.T., Zapf M.

in VISIGRAPP 2017 – Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications, 3 (2017) 330-334.

Abstract

Copyright © 2017 by SCITEPRESS – Science and Technology Publications, Lda. All rights reserved. The computer gaming industry is traditionally the moving power and spirit in the development of computer visualization hardware and software. This year, affordable and high quality virtual reality headsets became available and the science community is eager to get benefit from it. This paper describes first experiences in adapting the new hardware for three different visualization use cases. In all three examples existing visualization pipelines were extended by virtual reality technology. We describe our approach, based on the HTC Vive VR headset, the open source software Blender and the Unreal Engine 4 game engine. The use cases are from three different fields: large-scale particle physics research, X-ray-imaging for entomology research and medical imaging with ultrasound computer tomography. Finally we discuss benefits and limits of the current virtual reality technology and present an outlook to future developments.

Steinmann J.L., Blomley E., Brosi M., Brundermann E., Caselle M., Hesler J.L., Hiller N., Kehrer B., Mathis Y.-L., Nasse M.J., Raasch J., Schedler M., Schonfeldt P., Schuh M., Schwarz M., Siegel M., Smale N., Weber M., Muller A.-S.

in Physical Review Letters, 117 (2016), 174802. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.174802

Abstract

© 2016 American Physical Society. Using arbitrary periodic pulse patterns we show the enhancement of specific frequencies in a frequency comb. The envelope of a regular frequency comb originates from equally spaced, identical pulses and mimics the single pulse spectrum. We investigated spectra originating from the periodic emission of pulse trains with gaps and individual pulse heights, which are commonly observed, for example, at high-repetition-rate free electron lasers, high power lasers, and synchrotrons. The ANKA synchrotron light source was filled with defined patterns of short electron bunches generating coherent synchrotron radiation in the terahertz range. We resolved the intensities of the frequency comb around 0.258 THz using the heterodyne mixing spectroscopy with a resolution of down to 1 Hz and provide a comprehensive theoretical description. Adjusting the electron’s revolution frequency, a gapless spectrum can be recorded, improving the resolution by up to 7 and 5 orders of magnitude compared to FTIR and recent heterodyne measurements, respectively. The results imply avenues to optimize and increase the signal-to-noise ratio of specific frequencies in the emitted synchrotron radiation spectrum to enable novel ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy and metrology applications from the terahertz to the x-ray region.

Bergmann T., Balzer M., Bormann D., Chilingaryan S.A., Eitel K., Kleifges M., Kopmann A., Kozlov V., Menshikov A., Siebenborn B., Tcherniakhovski D., Vogelgesang M., Weber M.

in 2015 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, NSS/MIC 2015 (2016), 7581841. DOI:10.1109/NSSMIC.2015.7581841

Abstract

© 2015 IEEE. The EDELWEISS experiment, located in the underground laboratory LSM (France), is one of the leading experiments using cryogenic germanium (Ge) detectors for a direct search for dark matter. For the EDELWEISS-III phase, a new scalable data acquisition (DAQ) system was designed and built, based on the ‘IPE4 DAQ system’, which has already been used for several experiments in astroparticle physics.

Harbaum T., Seboui M., Balzer M., Becker J., Weber M.

in Proceedings – 24th IEEE International Symposium on Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines, FCCM 2016 (2016) 184-191, 7544775. DOI:10.1109/FCCM.2016.52

Abstract

© 2016 IEEE. Modern high-energy physics experiments such as the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at CERN produce an extraordinary amount of data every 25ns. To handle a data rate of more than 50Tbit/s a multi-level trigger system is required, which reduces the data rate. Due to the increased luminosity after the Phase-II-Upgrade of the LHC, the CMS tracking system has to be redesigned. The current trigger system is unable to handle the resulting amount of data after this upgrade. Because of the latency of a few microseconds the Level 1 Track Trigger has to be implemented in hardware. State-of-the-art pattern recognition filter the incoming data by template matching on ASICs with a content addressable memory architecture. An implementation on an FPGA, which replaces the content addressable memory of the ASIC, has not been possible so far. This paper presents a new approach to a content addressable memory architecture, which allows an implementation of an FPGA based design. By combining filtering and track finding on an FPGA design, there are many possibilities of adjusting the two algorithms to each other. There is more flexibility enabled by the FPGA architecture in contrast to the ASIC. The presented design minimizes the stored data by logic to optimally utilize the available resources of an FPGA. Furthermore, the developed design meets the strong timing constraints and possesses the required properties of the content addressable memory.

Rota L., Balzer M., Caselle M., Kudella S., Weber M., Mozzanica A., Hiller N., Nasse M.J., Niehues G., Schonfeldt P., Gerth C., Steffen B., Walther S., Makowski D., Mielczarek A.

in 2016 IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference, RT 2016 (2016), 7543157. DOI:10.1109/RTC.2016.7543157

Abstract

© 2016 IEEE. We developed a fast linear array detector to improve the acquisition rate and the resolution of Electro-Optical Spectral Decoding (EOSD) experimental setups currently installed at several light sources. The system consists of a detector board, an FPGA readout board and a high-Throughput data link. InGaAs or Si sensors are used to detect near-infrared (NIR) or visible light. The data acquisition, the operation of the detector board and its synchronization with synchrotron machines are handled by the FPGA. The readout architecture is based on a high-Throughput PCI-Express data link. In this paper we describe the system and we present preliminary measurements taken at the ANKA storage ring. A line-rate of 2.7 Mlps (lines per second) has been demonstrated.

Amstutz C. et al.

in 2016 IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference, RT 2016 (2016), 7543110. DOI:10.1109/RTC.2016.7543110

Abstract

© 2016 IEEE.The CMS collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of its detector, so it can operate during the high luminosity run of the LHC from 2026. The upgraded tracker electronics will reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles within a latency of a few microseconds, so that they can be used by the level-1 trigger. An emulation framework, CIDAF, has been developed to provide a reference for a proposed FPGA-based implementation of this track finder, which employs a Time-Multiplexed (TM) technique for data processing.

Amstutz C. et al.

in 2016 IEEE-NPSS Real Time Conference, RT 2016 (2016), 7543102. DOI:10.1109/RTC.2016.7543102

Abstract

© 2016 IEEE.A new tracking system is under development for operation in the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC. It includes an outer tracker which will construct stubs, built by correlating clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers for the rejection of hits from low transverse momentum tracks, and transmit them off-detector at 40 MHz. If tracker data is to contribute to keeping the Level-1 trigger rate at around 750 kHz under increased luminosity, a crucial component of the upgrade will be the ability to identify tracks with transverse momentum above 3 GeV/c by building tracks out of stubs. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are identified using a projective binning algorithm based on the Hough Transform. A hardware system based on the MP7 MicroTCA processing card has been assembled, demonstrating a realistic slice of the track finder in order to help gauge the performance and requirements for a full system. This paper outlines the system architecture and algorithms employed, highlighting some of the first results from the hardware demonstrator and discusses the prospects and performance of the completed track finder.

Hahn S., Muller Y., Hofmann R., Moosmann J., Oktem O., Helfen L., Guigay J.-P., Van De Kamp T., Baumbach T.

in Physical Review A – Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, 93 (2016), 053834. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevA.93.053834

Abstract

© 2016 American Physical Society. ©2016 American Physical Society. We analyze theoretically and investigate experimentally the transfer of phase to intensity power spectra of spatial frequencies through free-space Fresnel diffraction. Depending on λz (where λ is the wavelength and z is the free-space propagation distance) and the phase-modulation strength S, we demonstrate that for multiscale and broad phase spectra critical behavior transmutes a quasilinear to a nonlinear diffractogram except for low frequencies. On the contrary, a single-scale and broad phase spectrum induces a critical transition in the diffractogram at low frequencies. In both cases, identifying critical behavior encoded in the intensity power spectra is of fundamental interest because it exhibits the limits of perturbative power counting but also guides resolution and contrast optimization in propagation-based, single-distance, phase-contrast imaging, given certain dose and coherence constraints.