Hanschke D., Danilewsky A., Helfen L., Hamann E., Baumbach T.

in Physical Review Letters, 119 (2017), 215504. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.215504

Abstract

© 2017 American Physical Society. Correlated x-ray diffraction imaging and light microscopy provide a conclusive picture of three-dimensional dislocation arrangements on the micrometer scale. The characterization includes bulk crystallographic properties like Burgers vectors and determines links to structural features at the surface. Based on this approach, we study here the thermally induced slip-band formation at prior mechanical damage in Si wafers. Mobilization and multiplication of preexisting dislocations are identified as dominating mechanisms, and undisturbed long-range emission from regenerative sources is discovered.

Cecilia A., Jary V., Nikl M., Mihokova E., Hanschke D., Hamann E., Douissard P.-A., Rack A., Martin T., Krause B., Grigorievc D., Baumbach T., Fiederle M.

in Radiation Measurements, 62 (2014) 28-34. DOI:10.1016/j.radmeas.2013.12.005

Abstract

In this work, a group of Lu2SiO5:Tb (LSO:Tb) scintillating layers with a Tb concentration between 8% and 19% were investigated by means of synchrotron and laboratory techniques. The scintillation efficiency measurements proved that the highest light yield is obtained for a Tb concentration equal to 15%. At higher concentration, quenching processes occur which lower the light emission. The analysis of the reciprocal space maps of the (082) (280) and (040) Bragg reflections showed that LSO:Tb epilayers are well adapted on YbSO substrates for all the investigated concentrations. The spatial resolution tests demonstrated the possibility to achieve a resolution of 1 μm with a 6 μm thick scintillating layer. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Krause B., Miljevic B., Aschenbrenner T., Piskorska-Hommel E., Tessarek C., Barchuk M., Buth G., Donfeu Tchana R., Figge S., Gutowski J., Hanschke D., Kalden J., Laurus T., Lazarev S., Magalhaes-Paniago R., Sebald K., Wolska A., Hommel D., Falta J., Holy V., Baumbach T.

in Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 585 (2014) 572-579. DOI:10.1016/j.jallcom.2013.09.005

Abstract

The structure and morphology of uncapped and capped InGaN quantum dots formed by spinodal decomposition was studied by AFM, SEM, XRD, and EXAFS. As result of the spinodal decomposition, the uncapped samples show a meander structure with low Indium content which is strained to the GaN template, and large, relaxed Indium-rich islands. The thin meander structure is responsible for the quantum dot emission. A subsequently deposited low-temperature GaN cap layer forms small and nearly unstrained islands on top of the meander structure which is a sharp interface between the GaN template and the cap layer. For an InGaN cap layer deposited with similar growth parameters, a similar morphology but lower crystalline quality was observed. After deposition of a second GaN cap at a slightly higher temperature, the surface of the quantum dot structure is smooth. The large In-rich islands observed for the uncapped samples are relaxed, have a relatively low crystalline quality and a broad size distribution. They are still visible after capping with a low-temperature InGaN or GaN cap at 700 C but dissolve after deposition of the second cap layer. The low crystalline quality of the large islands does not influence the quantum dot emission but is expected to increase the number of defects in the cap layer. This might reduce the performance of complex devices based on the stacking of several functional units. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.